• As some states ban kratom, Michigan considers regulating it

    As some states ban kratom, Michigan considers regulating it0

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    • Steve Neavling
    • A handful of kratom pills.

    The car crash was just the beginning of Trish Richards’ nightmare.

    To cope with a broken collarbone and fractured ribs, the 37-year-old graphic artist was prescribed highly addictive opioids in October 2017.

    Eight months later, when her doctor stopped prescribing her painkillers, Richards quickly realized she was “hopelessly addicted.”

    “I was depressed, I couldn’t sleep, I never felt anything like it,” she tells Metro Times. “I started buying Oxies, Vicodin, Percocet, whatever I could find” from street dealers.

    Some of the pills were fake, and she suspects others were laced with the deadly opioid fentanyl, which claimed more than 1,300 lives in Michigan in 2017, according to the U.S.… Continue reading.

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  • Kratom supporters respond to recent FDA warning

    Kratom supporters respond to recent FDA warning0

    A CDC report released in April linked Kratom to 91 overdose deaths in 27 states, but Gini Downey, a Kratom user and member of the American Kratom Association, points in many of the overdose deaths, other drugs were also listed as contributing to the overdose. While the FDA states Kratom, like opioids, carry risks of abuse and addiction, supporters like Downey say it has the potential to save lives.… Continue reading.

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  • Kratom Is Unsafe As An Herbal Supplement, Finds New Review Of Poison Centers Data

    Kratom Is Unsafe As An Herbal Supplement, Finds New Review Of Poison Centers Data0

    Kratom, derived from the leaves of the southeast Asian tree Mitragyna speciosa, is a supplement that is not useless, it actually does something. It contains psychoactive compounds and users also like it as an analgesic, but because it is a plant users and kratom trade groups insist it should not have to go through clinical trials, even while they sell it as a product that is a drug.

    It is difficult to claim it should be on shelves with useless homeopathy products like Zicam or pointless multivitamins while selling it because it works as a drug and that is the struggle the industry faces.… Continue reading.

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  • FDA warns kratom sellers to stop making unproven claims about chronic pain, opioid addiction benefits

    FDA warns kratom sellers to stop making unproven claims about chronic pain, opioid addiction benefits0

    The Food and Drug Administration is still pressing down hard on kratom—the plant treatment that adherents say has helped them manage their opioid addiction or chronic pain. [June 25] the agency announced it was sending warning letters to two online marketers and distributors, accusing them of illegally selling kratom products with false or unproven claims about their health benefits.

    These claims, detailed by the FDA in its warning letters to the two firms, include that kratom can help with opioid addiction or pain relief, but also go as far as to suggest that it can treat arthritis, insomnia, and even cancer.Continue reading.

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  • Council delivers a dose of reality

    Council delivers a dose of reality0

    Multinational drug companies could learn a thing or two about kratom.

    We’re not talking about the plant’s potential to relieve pain or treat withdrawal of opioid drugs. It seems kratom has built up a cult following, some of it developed through social media. That kind of grassroots support contrasts sharply with the more polished and costly advertising from companies like Pfizer or GlaxoSmithKline.

    One person who hasn’t bought into the hype is Dr. Timothy Murphy, a St. Joseph physician who treats adolescents. Murphy, who sees the first-hand impact of teenage substance abuse, said kratom behaves like an opioid in larger doses and deserves to be regulated like mainstream drug products.… Continue reading.

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  • Pharmacist shares tips on buying supplements

    Pharmacist shares tips on buying supplements0

    – We spend hours every day online, and that is where companies are increasing advertising supplements for pain, a better night’s sleep,

    or a much-needed energy boost.

    The Food and Drug Administration recently issued warning letters to two companies that market and distribute kratom products online, through either social media or websites.

    The agency says the companies were illegally selling unapproved and misbranded kratom products, and making unproven claims they can treat or cure opioid addiction or ease withdrawal symptoms.

    Ashish Advani, a pharmacist and founder of InPharmD, a website and mobile app that allows medical professionals to ask questions about medication and get science-based answers, says the online supplement market is growing.… Continue reading.

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