• Did the DEA try to ban kratom?

    Did the DEA try to ban kratom?0




    © Provided by WGAL Lancaster-Harrisburg Kratom

    Kratom is currently legal at the federal level as well as in 44 U.S. states.

    The Drug Enforcement Agency has taken notice of the over-the-counter, plant-based supplement, which can have mind-altering effects.

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    In 2016, the DEA attempted to ban the chemicals in kratom. It announced that it intended to classify the active components in the plant into the Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. That is the same schedule as heroin, LSD, ecstasy and other illegal drugs.

    In its 2016 announcement, the agency stated:

    “Kratom is abused for its ability to produce opioid-like effects and is often marketed as a legal alternative to controlled substances.… Continue reading.

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  • Does the DEA want to ban kratom?

    Does the DEA want to ban kratom?0

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    Does the DEA want to ban kratom?

    WGAL News 8

    Kratom is currently legal at the federal level as well as in 44 U.S. states. However, the Drug Enforcement Administration has taken notice of the over-the-counter, plant-based supplement, which can have mind-altering effects.In 2016, the DEA attempted to ban the chemicals in kratom. It announced that it intended to classify the active components in the plant into the Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. That is the same schedule as heroin, LSD, ecstasy and other illegal drugs.In its 2016 announcement, the agency stated:”Kratom is abused for its ability to produce opioid-like effects and is often marketed as a legal alternative to controlled substances.… Continue reading.

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  • Natural herb kratom may have therapeutic effects and relatively low potential for abuse or harm, according to a user survey

    Natural herb kratom may have therapeutic effects and relatively low potential for abuse or harm, according to a user survey0

    IMAGE: This is a survey of adult kratom users in the US. view more 

    Credit: Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Using results of a survey of more than 2,700 self-reported users of the herbal supplement kratom, sold online and in smoke shops around the U.S., Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that the psychoactive compound somewhat similar to opioids likely has a lower rate of harm than prescription opioids for treating pain, anxiety, depression and addiction.

    In a report on the findings, published in the Feb. 3 issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence, the researchers caution that while self-reporting surveys aren’t always entirely reliable, they confirmed that kratom is not regulated or approved by the U.S.… Continue reading.

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  • Maryland bills aim to restrict herbal substance kratom

    Maryland bills aim to restrict herbal substance kratom0

    ANNAPOLIS — Kratom, a substance that users told lawmakers they take as a pain and addiction treatment, would see more stringent regulation in Maryland under legislation making its way through the General Assembly. Some government agencies advise against using the substance, calling it dangerous — while opponents of the bill are advocating for safety standards instead.

    Originating in southeast Asian countries, including Thailand and Indonesia, kratom is an herbal substance that comes from evergreen trees and has similar effects as opioids.

    House bill 283 would categorize kratom as among the most dangerous controlled substances in Maryland, a list that includes heroin, LSD, ecstasy and a hallucinogen called peyote.

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  • ‘Magical leaf’ or ‘imminent hazard’? Users love kratom, but feds might ban it

    ‘Magical leaf’ or ‘imminent hazard’? Users love kratom, but feds might ban it0

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The first time she used kratom, Ashley McCaughan was scared.

    Someone had suggested she try the controversial herbal supplement to fend off the aches and pains of her job managing a personal watercraft company in Florida. Shoving those heavy machines from the dock all day left her tired all the time.

    But with the first drink, she “noticed a positive effect on not only pain relief, but my mood,” said McCaughan, who is 27 and now lives in Blue Springs. “I was like a better version of myself.”

    As the country tries to stop a deadly epidemic of opioid abuse, more Americans — an estimated 15 million now — are turning to kratom to ease pain, quell anxiety and lift themselves out of depression.… Continue reading.

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  • The Week In Cannabis: Davos, Aphria’s Funding, Moves In Alaska, New York And Vermont

    The Week In Cannabis: Davos, Aphria’s Funding, Moves In Alaska, New York And Vermont0

    As the World Economic Forum unfolded in Davos, Switzerland, world leaders gathered to discuss, among other important topics, cannabis, its potential, its legalization, and the hurdles of such a process. Benzinga attended the pot-related events being held and you can check out our coverage here.

    Among notable moves that took place there was cannabis data and consulting company NOBL finalizing a Series A funding round of $1.64 million. The round was supported by Altitude Investment Management, Enexis AB and Artemis Growth Partners, among others.

    Meanwhile, lawmakers in Vermont filed a bill seeking to decriminalize psychedelic substances psilocybin, ayahuasca and peyote, as well as kratom, a plant with medicinal properties.

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