• Psychoactive substance exposures driving up calls to poison control centers: study

    Psychoactive substance exposures driving up calls to poison control centers: study0

    Columbus, OH — With more states legalizing marijuana for recreational use, the drug – along with other natural psychoactive substances – has caused a 74% increase in exposures since 2000, leading to approximately 10 calls a day to poison control centers.

    Using the National Poison Data System, researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center studied more than 67,300 calls to poison control centers made between 2000 and 2017.

    The overall rate of exposures to all-natural psychoactive substances rose to 30.7 per 1 million people in 2017 from 17.6 in 2000.… Continue reading.

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  • Somsak: Medical kratom to be legal soon

    Somsak: Medical kratom to be legal soon0

    Kratom will likely be taken off the national narcotics drug list in June this year, in a move to unlock its medical and economic benefits.

    The plant, known scientifically as Mitragyna speciosa, has long been used as a traditional medicine to treat pain, fever, dysentery and diarrhoea. But after it was categorised as a Type-5 narcotic 78 years ago, the government has spent millions of baht prosecuting people found possessing it or trading in it.

    Justice Minister Somsak Thepsutin is pushing ahead with its reclassification in the narcotics bill, even giving the precise date when he expects the bill to sail through parliament.… Continue reading.

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  • Kratom Health Benefits And Possible Dangers

    Kratom Health Benefits And Possible Dangers0

    It’s still illegal to import kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) and manufacture kratom as a dietary supplement in the United States. Kratom is known for its opioid properties and some stimulant-like effects but its usefulness and safety as a therapeutic agent remains unclear.

    This controlled substance is chewed, brewed or crushed into a bitter green powder. Kratom is mostly sold in the U.S. in processed forms such as pills, capsules or extracts.

    Medical professionals say a small amount of kratom can perk you up; a large dose has a sedative effect. Animal studies suggest kratom might be an effective pain reliever but the collection of human data has only just begun.… Continue reading.

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Want the scoop on Miami’s most talked-about local spots?

Yelp to deduce which eateries have been on the tips of diners’ tongues this month.

To find out who made the list, we looked at Miami businesses on Yelp by category and counted how many reviews each received. Rather than compare them based on number of reviews alone, we calculated a percentage increase in reviews over the past month, and tracked businesses that consistently increased their volume of reviews to identify statistically significant outliers compared to past performance.

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  • Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use

    Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use0

    IMAGE: A Purdue University team recently published a paper examining the effects of kratom and the potential impacts on people with alcohol use disorder. view more 

    Credit: Purdue University/Richard van Rijn

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Lawmakers across the United States continue to debate the safety of kratom, an opioid-containing plant that has been listed as a “drug of concern” by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Kratom is sold over the counter in specialty stores and online.

    Substance use disorders are a major health concern in the U.S. and a growing number of people suffering from these diseases are self-medicating with kratom to help break a cycle of dependence.

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  • Popular dietary supplement kratom may cause liver damage

    Popular dietary supplement kratom may cause liver damage0

    Kratom, a popular herbal supplement made from Mitragyna speciosa, an evergreen tree native to Southeast Asia, may cause liver damage, according to new preliminary findings.

    Some consumers use kratom to reduce fatigue, boost their energy or provide pain relief. It also sometimes is used to help with opioid withdrawal. 

    While kratom acts like a stimulant at low doses, researchers said it acts like an opioid when taken in large amounts, according to U.S. News & World Report. They said kratom has been linked to more than 90 deaths. 

    The researchers presented their findings Saturday at the meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases held in Boston.Continue reading.

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